Sepang–It Can Rain Snakes, It Can Rain and There Are Snakes.

Sepang is the second longest circuit in the championship, behind Silverstone.


This just in from Ducati

 

John Hopkins Suzuki 1000
The tropical heat–it can make the mechanics a little crazy. Nik On

 

Shell Malaysia GP at Sepang, a circuit in the jungle

Did you know…?

– Andrea Dovizioso was victorious at last year’s Malaysian Grand Prix. That weekend he also set pole position and the fastest race lap.

– Since last year’s GP, Andrea has accumulated a total of 6 wins with Ducati in the last 18 races, which means he has won one out of every three races since then.

– Ducati has had four victories in Sepang. In addition to Dovizioso’s win last year, there have been two with Stoner in 2007 and 2009, and one with Capirossi in 2005.

– The record top speed achieved at Sepang is held by Ducati at 339.6 km/h set in 2015.

– Of Lorenzo’s five championship titles, two of them he has obtained at the Malaysian GP: in 2007 he won his second 250cc championship, and in 2010 where he won the first of three in MotoGP.

– Lorenzo has only won once in Malaysia – in 2006 when he was racing in 250cc. However, since 2010, he has been on the Sepang podium every year, with a total of 6 podiums in MotoGP, which together with those achieved in 125cc and 250cc, total 9.

– In 2005, Ducati finished first and third with Capirossi and Checa, respectively, in a race in which the Spaniard made a spectacular comeback.

– Sepang was designed by Hermann Tilke, the architect who has created most of the circuits of the last 20 years. His designs include Bahrain, Shanghai, Istanbul, Valencia, Alcañiz, Yas Marina, Korea, Buddh, Austin, Chile, Russia, Thailand and Azerbaijan.

– With a length of 5,543 metres, Sepang is the second longest circuit in the championship, behind Silverstone. It is technical and fast at the same time, with two long straights and a front straight of 920 meters.

– Sepang is next to Montmeló and Motegi in the line-up of the most demanding circuits for braking. Here, riders are on the brakes for 37 seconds per lap, nearly 30% of the race.

– The braking for turn 1 is the hardest of the entire track, slowing from 331 km/h to 67 km/h. This requires a braking distance of 289 meters over a period of 6 seconds.

– Two of the last five GPs in Sepang have been held in the rain: in 2012 and 2016.

– Six corners have speeds lower than 85 km/h. It is the track with the most corners below this speed, which contrasts with the two straights where speeds over 300 km/h are reached, plus two other straights that reach 250 km/h, offering the most varied layout on the calendar.

– The 2012 race had to be stopped due to the quantity of water on the track. The race had not passed the two-thirds mark, but as conditions did not improve, the result was decided without continuing. In 2016, the start had to be delayed until the weather conditions improved.

 

 


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